No One Left: Why the World Needs More Children
Paul Morland

No One Left: Why the World Needs More Children


No One Left: Why the World Needs More Children addresses head-on the most important crisis facing the world today; with fertility rates falling almost everywhere, more and more of the world is already facing a shortage of people or soon will do so. At eight billion, the world’s population may be larger than ever but global decline is in sight, and before we get there, the blight of ageing and declining population will hit region after region and country after country. If you want to know what it’s like to run out of people, to see your schools shut down, your elderly dying alone and neglected, your government debt ballooning and your economy stagnant decade after decade, look at Japan. But Japan is just a bit ahead of the rest of us. On current trends, China's population may halve by the century's end and thereafter spiral towards its demise.

 No One Left: Why the World Needs More Children sets out the stark demographic reality, explains its deep-rooted causes in trends sweeping the world and looks for lessons in those places where the anti-natal trend is being bucked. Dubious of technological fixes and conscious of the limits of governmental intervention, the author will be propose a bold way forward, calling for the creation of a new pro-natalism which re-invents feminism, mutli-culturalism and environmentalism and embraces life.  

 

Book Details:

  • Author: Paul Morland
  • Published Year: 2024
  • Rights Sold
    • UK: Swift Press
Paul Morland

Paul Morland

Paul Morland has been described as the UK's and one of the world's leading demographers. He writes, broadcasts and podcasts about how great population trends have shaped our past and are shaping our future. He has been an associate research fellow at Birkbeck, University of London and a Senior Member of St Antony's College, University of Oxford.    He obtained a First in Philosophy, Politics and Economics (BA) and a Distinction in International Relations (M Phil), both from the University of Oxford. His PhD, for which he studied at Birkbeck, University of London, was published a...
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