Plundering the Public Sector
David Craig

Plundering the Public Sector

When they were in opposition, Labour lambasted the ruling Conservatives for spending £500m a year on consultants. Now they are in government, New Labour seem to have changed their minds and are spending close to £10bn a year on consultants. Frustrated with opposition to his reforms from the Labour Party and the Civil Service, Tony Blair has sidelined both and now makes and implements policy using his favourite consultants. The results have so far been disastrous - billions wasted on worthless consulting and failed IT systems. New Labour is planning to spend over £60bn on consultants - over £40bn will be wasted due to consultants' overselling, incompetence, greed and fraud. This will mean £40bn being taken out of frontline services like hospitals, schools, police and social services.

The end result will be a huge increase in administration, an equally huge decrease in frontline services, promotions and honours for those who have wasted the money and the creation of more millionaires than The National Lottery ever gave us.

Plundering the public sector is a shocking story of what will probably be the biggest waste of taxpayers' money in British history.

Book Details:

  • Author: David Craig
  • Published Year: 2006
  • Rights Sold
    • UK: Constable

David Craig

For over 20 years, David Craig has worked for and competed against some of the world's best and worst management consultancies. He has sold consulting in 15 countries in Europe, US and Asia to almost 100 organizations, including Disney, Mobil, Dupont, Roche, Air France, Eurotunnel, The NHS, CapGemini, Unilever and many others. He is the author of four other books on management and organizations
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Book Reviews

  • "Any sensible government would insist on making it compulsory reading for all ministers and senior civil servants. Fat chance."
    Robert Heller
  • "David Craig and Richard Brooks have performed an immense public service, and this horrifying book deserves a wide readership."
    Spectator