Nelson's Women
Tom Pocock

Nelson's Women

The fame of Horatio Nelson, as Britain's greatest naval hero, has always been shadowed by the notoriety of his relations with women. His love affair with Lady Hamilton and the subsequent abandonment of his wife have tainted with scandal his achievement in giving his country global supremacy for a century. Yet these two - Emma and Fanny - were only the most prominent of a gallery of young women - family, friends and lovers - who were instrumental in shaping Nelson's life and character.

In this book. Tom Pocock examines the characters of the women whose lives were interwoven with the complex, yet charming, personality of Lord Nelson. He illuminates the character of Nelson's mother. who married her social inferior, and his sisters who were torn between their friendships with his wife and his mistress. Nelson's Women provides a fascinating insight into the character of Britain's best-loved naval hero through his relationships with women.

Book Details:

  • Author: Tom Pocock
  • Published Year: 1999
  • Rights Sold
    • UK: Andre Deutsch

Tom Pocock

Tom Pocock is the author of 18 books (and editor of two more), mostly biographies but including two about his experiences as a newspaper war correspondent.Born in London in 1925 - the son of the novelist and educationist Guy Pocock - he was educated at Westminster School and Cheltenham College, joining the Royal Navy in 1943. He was at sea during the invasion of Normandy and, having suffered from ill-health, returned to civilian life and in 1945 became a war correspondent at the age of 19,the youngest of the Second World War.After four years wth the Hulton Press current affairs magazine gro...
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Book Reviews

  • "Tom Pocock has written several psychologically sensitive studies of the great man. Here he shows that he is just as good with women. The stories of Ladies Nelson and Hamilton are told with a pace and wit which still allow the author to be thoughful about the very difficult business of loving a national institution"
    Kathryn Hughes, Daily Telegraph
  • "Tom Pocock probably knows more about Nelson than anyone else alive today."
    Andrew Roberts, The Mail on Sunday